Audi Helps Refugees Find Jobs

A class for 18-25-year-old migrants will be starting in January, supported by Audi. The young participants will be able to attend school for a total of 24 weeks, preparing to obtain German school qualifications and to qualify for a vocational training.
A class for 18-25-year-old migrants will be starting in January, supported by Audi. The young participants will be able to attend school for a total of 24 weeks, preparing to obtain German school qualifications and to qualify for a vocational training.
 

Audi is helping refugees obtain German school qualifications and to qualify for vocational training. About 20 migrants aged 18 to 25 will be able to attend school for a total of 24 weeks starting in January 2016. Additional classes are already being planned for the coming school years. The manufacturer is providing financial support for these lessons from its immediate aid fund for refugees.

“Audi is helping to integrate refugees into the labor market and thus into society,” said Rupert Stadler, Chairman of the Board of Management of Audi AG. “We see this as an investment in the future of our company – and our country.”

The school project in Ingolstadt aims specifically at where there is the biggest need for non-state support; because the 18‑25-year‑old participants will probably be allowed to stay in Germany, but there is a lack of places in suitable schools. This makes it difficult for migrants to obtain the required qualifications through the regular school system.

The company is cooperating closely with the city of Ingolstadt, which has overall responsibility for the project. Students are selected by the Adult Education College and the Department for Social Welfare; the lessons are held at Vocational Training College I in Ingolstadt. “The project shows that together with the city, Audi is assuming responsibility for those issues that are of concern to the people here,” stated Mayor Dr. Christian Lösel. “Acquiring language skills and an education are two major elements of successful integration.”

Audi is supporting the city of Ingolstadt in this project with financing from the immediate‑aid fund that the company made available for refugee projects in September. At that time, the company approved a total amount of one million euros for its production locations. Audi employees can apply for financing from this fund for projects that they then implement together with charitable organisations.

For example, employees in Neckarsulm are helping to make donated bicycles roadworthy in cooperation with the city of Bad Rappenau. And they are involved in the integration of unaccompanied underage refugees for the Caritas charity in Heilbronn. Audi employees are also providing help at the company’s site in Győr, Hungary: The local Red Cross there has received from the company an additional ambulance vehicle including equipment, and the refugee camp in Vámosszabadi is being made fit for winter with the aid of Audi donations.

IgnitionLIVE Reporter